209 Beatdown 3: Results & Recap

August 19, 2017—A quiet, cavernous auditorium in Stockton, California crept to a crescendo of echoing chaos by the start of 209 Beatdown’s third installment: 209 Beatdown 3.

Nine of the twelve all-amateur bouts forced the judges to hold their opinions and four championship belts found their rightful owners, but an infinite number of audible reactions reverberated from the hardwood floors of the Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium to its ornate, vaulted ceiling throughout the evening’s entirety.

NorCal MMA’s Performances of the Night

Although 209 Beatdown’s athletes competed under a layer of C.A.M.O (California Amateur Mixed Martial Arts Organization), every strike and grappling exchange sharpened fight fans’ visibility on their desire to discover success. The contests that stood out, as if in high-definition versus standard resolution, were awarded NorCal MMA’s Knockout of the Night, Submission of the Night, and Fight of the Night.

Knockout of the Night: Erick Pierre

 

 

 

 

Submission of the Night: Nick Maximov

 

 

 

 

Fight of the Night: Khari Snowden and Khai Wu

 

 

 

 

 

209 Beatdown 3’s results include:

Daniel Compton defeated Jared Velasquez by way of TKO in round 1 (1:53) to retain the 209 Beatdown Light Heavyweight Title

Brandon Olson defeated Frank Farmer by way of unanimous decision to claim the 209 Beatdown Lightweight Title

Khari Snowden defeated Khai Wu by way of split-decision to claim the 209 Beatdown interim Featherweight Title

David Dzasokhov defeated Chris Burton by way of unanimous decision to claim the 209 Beatdown Featherweight Title

Diego Zuria defeated Anthony Lopez by way of TKO in round 1 (1:58)

Nick Maximov defeated Nick Davis by way of triangle choke in round 1 (:39)

Solomon Valentine defeated Ismael Carranza by way of TKO in round 3 (1:34)

Wayne Just defeated Kyle Davalos by way of TKO in round 1 (:22)

Fredy Calvo defeated Jarell Thomas by way of TKO in round 2 (1:11)

Conan Orozco defeated Josh Casem by way of TKO in round 3 (1:21)

Erick Pierre defeated Philip Schwartz by way of KO in round 1 (:14)

David Sok defeated David Vu by way of KO in round 1 (1:38)

209 Beatdown will return to the heart of Stockton on January 6, 2018 for 209 Beatdown 4.

Advertisements

209 Beatdown 3 *Live Results*

JR Entertainment returns to the Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium on August 19, 2017 to serve an evening of amateur mixed martial arts with a card, entitled 209 Beatdown 3, sure to charm an MMA enthusiast at any level.

Four championship belts balance on baited breath in the third installment of the young promotion. The upcoming event will pair prospects throughout Northern California to emerge with—whether victorious or not—invaluable experience.

Keep up with the play-by-play and other live updates of Dragon House 26 by following along on Twitter or Facebook: @norcalfightmma.

209 Beatdown 3’s results include:

Khai Wu vs. Khari Snowden for the interim 209 Beatdown Featherweight Title

  • Results: Snowden def. Wu via split-decision

Frank Farmer vs. Brandon Olson for the vacant 209 Beatdown Lightweight Title

  • Results: Olson def. Farmer via unanimous decision

Daniel Compton vs. Jared Velasquez for the vacant 209 Beatdown Light Heavyweight Title

  • Results: Compton def. Velasquez via TKO in round 1 (1:53)

Chris Burton vs. David Dzasokhov for the 209 Beatdown Featherweight Title

  • Results: Dzasokhnov def. Burton via unanimous decision

Anthony Lopez vs. Diego Zuria in the middleweight division

  • Results: Zuria def. Lopez via TKO in round 1 (1:58)

Nick Maximov vs. Nick Davis in the light heavyweight division

  • Results: Maximov def. Davis via triangle choke in round 1 (:39)

Ismael Carranza vs. Solomon Valentine in the middleweight division

  • Results: Valentine def. Carranza via TKO in round 3 (1:34)

Wayne Just vs. Kyle Davalos in the welterweight division

  • Results: Just def. Davalos via TKO in round 1 (:22)

Jarell Thomas vs. Fredy Calvo in the lightweight division

  • Results: Calvo def. Thomas via TKO in round 2 (1:11)

Josh Casem vs. Conan Orozco in the featherweight division

  • Results: Orozco def. Casem via TKO in round 3 (1:21)

Philip Schwartz vs. Erick Pierre in the bantamweight division

  • Results: Pierre def. Schwartz via KO in round 1 (:14)

David Sok vs. David Vu in the flyweight division

  • Results: Sok def. Vu via KO in round 1 (1:38)

209 Beatdown 3: Preview

JR Entertainment returns to the Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium on August 19, 2017 to serve an evening of amateur mixed martial arts with a card, entitled 209 Beatdown 3, sure to charm an MMA enthusiast at any level.

Four championship belts balance on baited breath in the third installment of the young promotion. The upcoming event will pair prospects throughout Northern California to emerge with—whether victorious or not—invaluable experience.

According to camomma.org (link here), 209 Beatdown 3’s lineup reads as:

Khai Wu vs. Khari Snowden for the interim 209 Beatdown Featherweight Title

Frank Farmer vs. Brandon Olson for the vacant 209 Beatdown Lightweight Title

Daniel Compton vs. Konosha Saunders for the vacant 209 Beatdown Light Heavyweight Title

Chris Burton vs. David Dzasokhov for the 209 Beatdown Featherweight Title

Anthony Lopez vs. Diego Zuria in the middleweight division

Nick Maximov vs. Nick Davis in the light heavyweight division

Ismael Carranza vs. Keith Cuyno in the middleweight division

Wayne Just vs. Kyle Davalos in the welterweight division

Jarell Thomas vs. Fredy Calvo in the lightweight division

Solomon Valentine vs. Dominic Hill in the lightweight division

Josh Casem vs. Conan Orozco in the featherweight division

Philip Schwartz vs. Erick Pierre in the bantamweight division

David Sok vs. Dareld Phillips in the flyweight division

From VIP tables to floor seats to all the way in the balcony, the venue is stuffed with enthusiasm to push those pursuing their dreams. To reserve a seat of your own, go to: www.eventbrite.com/e/209beatdown-iii-extreme-cage-fighting.

Olin Pettit Jr.: Sharpening His Stockton Edge Before Conquer 4

Following a flawless performance in his MMA debut, ‘Rollin’ Olin Pettit Jr. allowed his hardened Stockton stare to soften as his hand was lifted in victory, yet any semblance of a smile quickly vanished thereafter.

Fresh from a destructive showcase of strengths in his own backyard, the warm and fuzzy feelings flittering around Pettit Jr. at 209 Beatdown 2 earlier this year froze like the ice in his veins the moment an offer from Conquer Fighting Championships emerged, inviting him to be featured in their upcoming eventConquer 4. Violence enthusiasts can witness the transformation firsthand when the prospect out of the Nick Diaz Academy appeared on Let’s Talk MMA (link here) to discuss his featherweight affair against Ian Masioff for the fight promotion housed in the Port of Richmond.

Currently, Pettit Jr. competes as an amateur under the bylaws of C.A.M.O (California Amateur Mixed Martial Arts Organization), but his outlook on the hurt business already mirrors the Skrap Pack’s street fighting bravado. At first, the eighteen year-old purred with delight when reminiscing about his match-up against Andrew Charles Tack within the walls of the Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium, 209 Beatdown’s venue.

“It was really fun,” he initially hummed. The insights of his coaches and training were affirmed the second the bell sounded, “Leading into the fight, we were working a lot of straights and all that, just working clinching and stuff, so it was fun when I went in there and did all my skill set. It came all-natural.”

The contest at Conquer 4 will take place in the featherweight division, Pettit Jr.’s preferred weight class, but a hint of the swagger popularized by the Diaz Brothers reared its head when he described why he was forced to tip the scales as a lightweight:

“Well…Originally, I was supposed to fight at 145 at my first one, but my original opponent pulled out—I don’t even know why. They didn’t tell me why he pulled out. He could have been scared or whatever. But they got me this other opponent, and he (Tack) said he didn’t want to cut the weight to 145. He wanted to do 155.” Willing to challenge a giant to defend his territory, the executives of 209 Beatdown could have rolled a heavyweight into the cage, and ‘Rollin’ would have accepted, “I had a bunch of friends and family coming to this, so I didn’t want to be like, ‘Nah, I don’t want to fight dude.’ I didn’t really mind it.”

While most amateur fighters dock at the developmental ranks for a lengthy stay, compiling a large sum of experience before eventually proceeding to deadlier waters, the prizefighting thought-process indoctrinated into Pettit Jr. since the age of twelve, for one, entails: fill your bank account with as much cash as possible; therefore, according to the young prodigy, Conquer 4 will be his last outing before bounding into the pros:

“I’m hoping this will be my last (amateur) one on June 24th. We get this ‘dub’ (W); I’m going to go pro after, making some moves and getting paid a lot more.”

Of course, Pettit Jr. can’t, and isn’t, looking past Masioff, but he assured listeners, in the same dismissive tone as his mentors: anything his opponent can do, he can do better:

“I watched his (Masioff’s) fight last time. I guess he’s supposed to be some Jiu-Jitsu dude, but I’m a Jiu-Jitsu dude, too; and I feel like I have years ahead of him. I train with some of the best people in Jiu-Jitsu: Nate Diaz, Nick Diaz; I’ve got Randy Spence, who is my head coach in Jiu-Jitsu. They’re all really good black belts. I’m not really too worried about it. If it goes to the ground, it goes to the ground. That’s where I’m more comfortable at.”

Before Pettit Jr. finds himself in MMA’s big leagues, those who keep tabs on the regional circuit should embrace his progression in Northern California’s present-tense marketplace by following him on Twitter (link here), Facebook (link here), and Instagram (link here); otherwise, they’ll end up slapping themselves, with the only open-palm strike attached to an area code, for not doing so sooner.

3 Things Learned at 209 Beatdown II

209 Beatdown, an all-amateur MMA promotion housed in Northern California, opened its doors to 209 Beatdown II on April 29, 2017, rang its bell, and created a rich setting—including both fans and fighters alike—for learning.

The amateur ranks in mixed martial arts allow athletes to discover their potential as prizefighters while receiving payments in bundles of experience. For those peering into the cage from outside, 209 Beatdown’s sophomore showcase, presented by JR Entertainment, broadcasted a fight card crammed with an incredible array of ability, which coupled the promotion’s intent to entertain with an invaluable lesson: JR Entertainment is spotlighting the region’s top teams and competitors and making a push in the game of promoting C.A.M.O (California Amateur Mixed Martial Arts Organization) certified MMA.

Levels MMA

One of the more successful teams on display at 209 Beatdown II traveled inland from Marina: Levels MMA.

Frank Farmer, Ismael Romero, and Robert Davis flew the flag of Levels MMA and performed with an unrivaled intensity, elevating the attention being drawn to the growing fight team.

Frank Farmer

As the defending 209 Beatdown Welterweight Champion, Farmer wasted no time in reigning supreme over Stephen Martin. Moments after the hum of the bell died, an off-balance takedown from Martin invited Farmer to bury Martin’s neck into the crook of his arm. Twenty-seconds into the contest, the amateur champ, who earned NorCal MMA’s Submission of the Night, added to his crop of wins and will continue his ascent at 170-pounds.

Ismael Romero

Romero versus Esley Colson for the 209 Beatdown Middleweight Title—NorCal MMA’s choice for Fight of the Night—played out like a violent game of seesaw on the playground. The first round favored Colson’s well-rounded offense, but the pendulum swung in Romero’s favor when he returned to action from the stool. In a tale of two rounds, Romero, with a TKO stoppage, wrote the chapter on his tenacious toughness before those in attendance at 209 Beatdown II and proudly hoisted the 185-pound strap above his head.

Robert Davis

Davis dominated in his middleweight match opposite Eddie Leyva. Walking into enemy territory with a non-stop pressure from a different plane of reality, the rising prospect out of Levels MMA actively sought the finish from every position. An arm bar, cranked with equal parts technique and desire, forced Leyva to concede and spiked the decibels through the Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium’s classically designed ceiling.

Blurring the Lines Between Amateur and Professional

Not only did Chris Burton close the curtain on 209 Beatdown II’s evening in the main event—challenging for the vacant 209 Beatdown Bantamweight Title—he sealed the deal on his stint in the amateurs with a Knockout of the Night victory over Daniel Oseguera. Leading in to the championship affair on April 29th, the Stockton native, who also owned the 209 Beatdown Featherweight Title, discussed on Episode 1 of NorCal MMA’s Fight Talk (link here) his intentions of turning pro once a belt hung from each shoulder. In a flawless outing before his hometown crowd, it was difficult to determine anything amateur about Burton’s style of attack.

No Judges Needed at 209 Beatdown II

The only people bored to tears inside the Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium during 209 Beatdown II were those in charge of doling out points. When all ten fights finalized before regulation, 209 Beatdown II was punctuated with exclamatory cheers, instead of leaving decisions in the hands of others and causing curling trails of confusion. Ideal matchmaking and an environment conducive for fighters to throw caution to the wind created the perfect conditions for hopeful stars in MMA to shine.

When 209 Beatdown refills their headquarters in the heart of Stockton in August for 209 Beatdown III, you don’t want to be the fight fan wearing a dunce cap in the corner because you never purchased a ticket.

 

 

Olin Pettit Jr.: A Debut That Proudly Represents the 209 at 209 Beatdown II

For a brief moment, Olin Pettit Jr. snapped his hardened stare with a wide smile after earning a TKO victory in his amateur MMA debut.

Parting a deafening black sea of T-shirts, hoodies, and hats, the eighteen year-old fighter from Gracie Jiu-Jitsu entered the cage at 209 Beatdown II on April 29, 2017 and stapled the skin of Andrew Tack onto the wall of his win column.

Round 1

At the sound of the bell, Tack left the red corner with his hands in his pockets; whereas, Pettit Jr.’s chin was hidden from view with hands primed to bite like a venomous snake. Interestingly enough, Pettit Jr.’s opening punch resembled a ‘Stockton Sledgehammer,’ instead of a ‘Stockton Slap.’

Tack didn’t hesitate to launch his own attack, but he was unable to implement a successful offense. A hip toss from Tack pinned Pettit Jr.’s back to the canvas—only long enough to sear it. Immediately, the lightweight representing his hometown’s gritty fight culture returned to a position of dominance, pressing Tack into the fence as if it were cork board.

Prior to the curtain clamping shut on the round, Pettit punctuated his ability to bounce between grappling and striking by creating enough space to unload several shots in Tack’s direction, reminding the visitor: nowhere is safe inside 209 Beatdown’s cast-iron walls.

Round 2

Shortly into the middle frame, Pettit Jr.’s pinpoint accuracy sent shockwaves throughout his support system seated within the Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium.

When Pettit Jr. had Tack backpedaling, Tack attempted to secure a guillotine; however, Pettit Jr.’s technical application on the ground steadied nerves that would otherwise fray. Once Pettit Jr. popped his head free, he resumed control, baiting Tack to surrender his back. Inch-by-inch, Pettit Jr.’s arm coiled around Tack’s neck and under his chin; a lightning fast change of grips slowly shut the power of Tack’s consciousness out.

At the ten-second clapper, the young shark smelled blood in the water, bit down on his mouthpiece, and squeezed with crushing strength. The audience interpreted the horn as an end to the round, but Tack used it as an alarm clock.

Slow to escape a momentary slumber, Tack stumbled toward his stool. The cage side physician closely monitored the situation in the action’s interim and eventually waved off the lightweight contest.

One bout in the books and Northern California’s crazed contingent of MMA fans eagerly await Pettit Jr. to scribe more chapters over the course of his stint in the amateurs—and beyond.